Coronavirus precautions

Due to the government advice for everyone to avoid religious gatherings and other social interaction, the Church of England has decided to stop holding any public services. Please be assured that the Church community continues to pray for and serve all in our parish and country.

Due to ongoing works to our organ we reluctantly cannot keep the church building open at the moment. Please feel free to use the churchyard for prayer and reflection, or any other nearby churches. Brettenham, Thorpe Morieux or Rattlesden are all open during the day.

If you would appreciate a phone call or support from the Rector please contact Reverend Tiffer Robinson on 01449737197, 07789772024 or tifferrobinson@gmail.com

Hitcham Parish Church

All Saints Church, Hitcham is a community of Christians in The Church of England (Diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich) who seek to love and serve one another and all in the parish of Hitcham.

We are blessed with a wonderful medieval building, right on the edge of the village (on the way to Bildeston) which is beautiful, light, and hard to maintain!  It is open in daylight hours most days of the year, and you would be very welcome to join us for worship at 11am every Sunday.

The largely C14th All Saints Church is a grade one listed building. Knocked about a bit by the reforming Protestants but spared the excesses of Victorian ‘modernisation’, it has stood as a monument to mans’ skill and devotion to Christianity for more than 700 years.

Visitors’ initial impression is of the church’s size and simplicity. On closer inspection it not only contains important architectural features but also has an interesting history in that a past rector, Professor John Stevens Henlsow and its school children have played key roles in Darwin’s Theory of Evolution.

To find out more about the architecture of Hitcham Church click here

And for information on John Stevens Henslow click here

 

Some useful links

Hitcham All Saints

Rattlesden Benefice website

About Hitcham All Saints (on BritainExpress.com)

About Hitcham All Saints (Simon’s Suffolk Churches)

The Friends of All Saints Hitcham Church

The Friends of All Saints Hitcham Church was established in 1998 to support the Parochial Church Council  in fundraising to preserve and protect the church both as a place of Christian worship and as the architectural centre piece of the village. It uses as its logo one of the rare quatrefoil clerestory windows in the church.

Together they have successfully carried out over £225k of repairs and improvements to the building, and are half way through the final phase of the restoration work, the Tower Project, which incorporates the repair and restoration of the bells with the creation of a room at the base of the tower to provide a servery and self-enclosed equal access WC. The organ, which used to block the tower arch, has now been moved to the north aisle, making room for the new ringing floor and opening up the view to the large west window.

Thanks to a major grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund and the support of many others this work is well under way, with the bells due back in the autumn.

The new WC and servery has received a major grant from Viridor Credits, so work will start soon. This will enable the church building to be used for public events such as concerts and exhibitions to help with future fund raising and making the building more self-sufficient. It will also ensure that the wider village community use the building more.

The architect’s drawings provided by Philip Orchard of Whitworth Partnership illustrate the proposals in more detail. To see the full list of charities which contributed click here.

To join the Friends of Hitcham Church, make a donation or enquire about leaving a legacy please contact Nicola Currie rnfcurrie@hotmail.co.uk or The Rector at The Rectory Rattlesden, Bury St Edmunds IP30 0RA tel 01449 737197. To view the Friends of Hitcham Church Data Protection Policy click here.

Thanks for donations…

The Friends of All Saints Church Hitcham are grateful to the people who made so many generous donations and to the following charities for their support: The National Lottery Heritage Fund Sapphire Grantmaking Fund Scarfe Charitable Trust The Ganzone Charitable Trust...

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Waste makes a Warm Welcome

Waste makes a Warm Welcome

Hitcham is celebrating winning a major grant from Viridor Credits for a Community Hub in their village church. The independent charity has awarded the £100k project, a whopping £68k grant through the Landfill Communities Fund (LCF) from their Mason’s site which will...

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Security Watch keeps village church bells safe

Security Watch keeps village church bells safe

Hitcham villagers mounted a 24-hour security watch to keep their church bells safe from thieves after they were lowered to the ground ready to be restored. ‘We have spent the last three weeks preparing for this weekend,’ explained Nicola Currie, Project Co-ordinator....

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Bricked up church door reveals hidden secrets

Bricked up church door reveals hidden secrets

A doorway in the church tower at All Saints Church, Hitcham, has been reopened after 149 years. The work has been part of a major restoration project to restore the bells. The door was bricked up in 1871 when the musicians’ gallery in the church tower become unsafe...

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Hitcham’s Lottery Success!

Hitcham’s Lottery Success!

Thanks to funding received from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, the Reverend Professor John Stevens Henslow’s work will finally be recorded in a permanent exhibition in Hitcham church where he was once rector. Henslow is of regional, national and international...

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About the Church

ALL SAINTS CHURCH consists of a large west tower, clerestoried nave, long chancel, two aisles, south porch and north double-storeyed vestry. This article gives more information about its history and architecture

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Professor John Stevens Henslow

In 1837 John Henslow – Regius Professor of Botany at Cambridge – came to Hitcham, a village described at the time as being “a populous, remote and woefully neglected parish, where the inhabitants, with regard to food and clothing and the means of observing the decencies of life, were far below the average scale of the peasant class in England.” As Rector he set about improving the life of his parishioners.

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